Category Archives: Engines

Briggs Transparent Cylinder Head Engine

I’ve been following a series of videos on YouTube of a couple of guys who have been busy building a Briggs and Stratton engine with a transparent cylinder head. They’ve now got it running surprisingly well:

Further to this, another YouTuber has build a transparent cylinder head Briggs engine and filmed it in 4K then run it on Gasoline, Alcohol and Acetylene . Well worth a watch:

Separated Rotary Engine

This is a pretty interesting concept – very similar to a ‘split cycle’ engine – basically the rotary version. A split cycle engine has the benefit of being able to split the compression and expansion cycles of a traditional internal combustion engine. This allows for different geometries in the combustion and expansion chamber, allowing for things such as very high expansion ratios verses compression ratios, and also potentially volume combustion in the case of this particular engine.

It looks as though this engine would still suffer some of the difficulties of traditional rotary engines, but still a very interesting concept!

3SGTE Mk2 MR2 Turbo Lambda/Oxygen Sensor Part Number

I had real trouble finding a suitable alternative oxygen/lambda probe for my 1992 Rev 2 MR2 Turbo. I can’t find the original Denso part number at the moment, but I managed to find that a Denso DOX-0107 fits the flange size correctly and is 1-wire, it just requires soldering to the original connector. It’s got a Flange 44 type flange which apparently matches the 3SGTE.

I got it from http://service-parts.co.uk/denso-oxygen-sensor-dox-0107

Duke Axial Engine

So a friend told me about the Duke Axial Engine the other day. It’s certainly a very interested idea and does produce some clever solutions to some of the fundamental complexities and disadvantages to the reciprocating internal combustion engine. I always like the idea of novel engine designs, and this one certainly looks like it has potential. Take a look at the video followed by some analysis after the break.

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Rover Mini MPi Inlet Manifold and Throttle Body

I’m embarking on a project to fuel inject my 1987 Austin Mini, which has already had an engine swap from a 998 to a 1098, but currently runs on an HS4 1.5″ single carburettor.

This obviously offers a reasonable level of tunability, with the ability to change needles, dashpot damper springs, dashpot oil and mixture adjustment and is relatively easy to set up for quite a reasonable state of tune, especially now that I have an AFR meter installed.

However, I would like to try fitting an MPI system and develop my own ECU for electronic fuel injection. Due to the ‘Siamese ports’ on the A-Series engine causing charge robbing, and only having one fuel injector per two ports, this is apparently something that’s difficult to achieve well, which makes me want to do it all the more.

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What does a Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor do?

Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP)/ Manifold Pressure sensors are used to determine the pressure of the air inside the inlet manifold, just before it enters the engine inlet ports. This is generally measured between the Throttle Body and the intake ports on a naturally aspirated engine, and between the turbocharger compressor outlet (after the Intercooler) on turbocharged or supercharged engines.

GM Manifold Absolute Pressure sensor

GM/Bosch Manifold Absolute Pressure sensor

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Innovate Wideband Lambda sensor

I received an Innovate Wideband lambda/oxygen/AFR gauge for Christmas and decided to get it installed on my ’87 classic Mini today. Last year I fitted a new stainless exhaust system with a stainless Maniflow LCB 3-2-1 exhaust header, stainless centre silencer and RC40 millennium twin centre exit DTM back box. The lambda sensor requires fitting a threaded boss into the exhaust. The exaust system has a Y piece where the headers join to the centre pipe, and this is th most appropriate place for a lambda sensor as it measures all cylinders.

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