Arduino ECU By Brenamanf

I was sent a link to this website by the author, who appears to have created an Arduino ECU for spark control. Although the details are a little sparse, It appears that he has developed a lot of the required hardware himself. It looks like the main controller is an Arduino Nano and utilises Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) and a knock sensor to determine the ignition timing on a Peugeot 205 Tu9 45Ch. It would appear that the ECU has been developed over a number of revisions and has been in operation for over a year.

http://brenamanf.wordpress.com/page/2/

Video Explanation

I’ve made a video of the whole system explaining all of the sensors, actuators and interfaces, and some of the more advanced indicating equipment that I’m using.

A more detailed explanation of the closed loop ignition timing control is given here: http://scottsnowden.co.uk/?p=341

Closed Loop Ignition Timing Control

I have been busy over the last few weeks with various things, but have now completed most of the practical work on my project and am now at the stage of writing up the report/dissertation. I have successfully managed to achieve closed loop ignition timing control by using the Stellaris Launchpad development board to directly interface with the optical encoder on the engine and the pressure sensor charge amplifier (this replaces the AVL IndiSet 620 in my system).

ECU in black on left, angle of peak pressure and optical encoder interface on right. Connected together via serial

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Exhaust heat exhanger

In order to run the engine inside, I had to set up an external exhaust to get the fumes outside. This had been done with a big exhaust manifold attached to a flexi rubber marine exhaust hose, and then poked through a hole in the wall. This was ok operating the engine at idle and under low loads, but the rubber hose would get extremely hot under high load high speed conditions. It then began to melt internally and was causing the whole building to smell of burning rubber.

Copper pipe exhaust cooler (not good…)

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High Speed ADCs and Interfacing with Texas Instruments ADS8321

I needed a high speed ADC for sampling in cylinder pressure for my ECU, and settled on trying a few from Texas Instruments. I am using an optical encoder on the engine which provides 720 pulses per revolution . If I took a sample every pulse, then at 6000 RPM (100 Hz) then I would be looking at about 720 * 100 Hz = 72,000 Samples per Second (SPS) or 72kHz ( although I realise now that I could take a sample on each edge, resulting in 1440 samples per revolution, or 144,000 SPS). That’s pretty high speed, considering most ADCs built into microcontrollers take a few microseconds to perform their conversion which results in a sampling rate of perhaps up to 50,000 SPS max for the Arduino for example. DSP chips or higher end micros probably have better performance, but for the sake of learning, I fancied trying to use an external ADC anyway.

8 MSOP breakout


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Getting High Tech

Just a quick one on what I’ve been up to the last few days. I now have the engine set up inside so that I don’t have to keep pushing it outside or waiting for the rain to stop. I’ve also set up an optical encoder, in-cylinder pressure sensor, and AVL IndiSet high speed data acquisition unit to capture data on a 0.25 degree crank angle resolution.

Extended exhaust manifold for indoor running

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